Episode 106 18 The Gormo 3 Link Coupling Pt II

Discussion in 'The Collection' started by gormo, Jun 1, 2018.

  1. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Pete,
    I tried your suggestion about drilling the hook. The hook is really a bit too thin. The flattening out is easy enough but there`s not much left to drill through. I think I`ll stick with the glue it to the sides of the hook method........We have to try these things......nothing ventured, nothing gained......thanks for the suggestion.
    :tophat:Gormo
     
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  2. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Martin,
    Good on you for having a go at the links. It`s easy when you know how.
    I am still not 100% sure about whether to bother with them actually. They certainly look good, but when I`m running a train I need to get down to rail level to appreciate them.......anyway that`s just me nit picking.!!!
    I suppose at the end of the day, when the wagons are sitting around in a yard, a casual look at the couplings at both ends tells the eye that all is complete.
    I think I just answered my own doubts.
    Maybe the next Gormo`s Shed should be about making your own chains...?????? :scratchchin:
    :tophat:Gormo
     
  3. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Folks,
    Some more fine tuning and problem solving with the three link system.
    As you can see in the pic below, it is possible for the chain to rotate through 180 degrees in the horizontal plane.
    The chain usually does does not get to the extreme ends of the arc, however given the right circumstances it can happen.
    When pushing 4, 5 or 6 or more small wagons, it usually will not happen, however when you add more weight / resistance to the train, instead of the chain pushing the wagons, it follows the path of least resistance to either end of the arc and we get buffer lock and derailment. This situation usually only arises when pushing through an "S" point formation.

    DSC06026_v1.JPG

    So how do we stop the chain from reaching the point of no return. ? In other words, limit it`s range of movement with creating a new problem. Some movement is required, but probably a range of about 90 degrees would be sufficient.
    So trial and error has resulted in the split pin chain anchor being converted over to an anchor and hook arrangement.


    I should point out that now that the chain links are being silver soldered as well. Silver solder is five times stronger than standard solder. Some of my soldering is not as neat as it could be thanks to cruel close ups.
    This is how the new arrangement looks. When the chain is in the horizontal position / connected, the up facing hook restricts the swing of the chain down to an arc of about 90 degrees rather than the original of 180 degrees.


    You can see more clearly here in the overhead shot


    The result is quite effective and when you reach that point where the chain would normally travel into dangerous territory, the up facing hook stops it and directs the forces forward in the direction of the movement of the train.
    A bonus with this method is that you have a hook at either end of the wagon that can be used to connect to a chain. This is particularly helpful for attaching a brake van the wrong way around or running around with a loco.
    The pic below shows two up facing hooks connected.



    I have also adopted the dummy chain for the other end of the wagon. The links are non magnetic , made at home and held on the hook with a tiny drop of Superglue. It just balances out the look of the system


    So there you are folks.......this would definitely have to be classified as a work in progress.

    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
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