Platform 1 Model Railway Community Home 


Welcome to Platform1mrc.com
Thank you for taking the time to browse the forum, if you would like to participate in any of the discussions.
Registration is only a click away Register Here.

 Moderated by: Toto
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Soldering Course
AuthorPost
 Posted: 19 Nov 2017 23:48
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
Toto
Founder


Joined: 4 Dec 2015
Location: Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Posts: 8140
Status: 
Offline
This is something I have looked into before but the only thing I could come up with was " hobby holidays ". Now ...... Nothing wrong with that but there maybe a couple of issues. The first being I think they are way down south and second, I think minimum numbers would be required to even ask them if a bespoke course could be accommodated.

So ...... As it looks like I have committed myself to constructing various brass kits and would like to do them justice ........ Does anyone else now of a course or ...... Someone who would be prepared to give a lesson or two. Preferably an experienced modeller ?

Is there anyone else who would be interested in making up a class of say ( probably ) six or eight people. Keeping it in mind that we would have to pay for it and there could be accommodation etc involved.

I'd be up for travelling for a weekend, ie , travel Friday night, course on Saturday and home Sunday. Could be at a date to suit.

What's your thoughts

Toto



____________________
Sometimes I wish the world was full of Norman Wisdoms. Chaotic ......... Yes, but a world where the sun shines on everyone
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 14:13
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
ianvolvo46
Moderator


Joined: 8 Dec 2015
Location: Nerja, Spain
Posts: 2985
Status: 
Offline
I reckon Keith's your man Toto he's something of an expert and living in Chesterfield its pretty central plus I can recommend the Premier inn and bars in town. Also the preserved Butterly line is just a short walk through the woods from there so .....:scratchchin:



____________________
Christmas; ... the time when everyone gets Santamental! ..
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 16:39
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
Rob Pulham
Tight Fisted Yorkshireman


Joined: 15 Sep 2017
Location: The Rhubarb Triangle, United Kingdom
Posts: 270
Status: 
Offline
Possibly too far away in terms of time, and distance but I am doing a demo of brass kit building at the Stainmore Railway exhibition (held at Kirkby Stephen East Station in Cumbria) on the 23/24th of June next year. Where I plan to demo both using a soldering iron and a microflame to build kit's.

What I have yet to decide is whether to do a wagon or a loco (I will probably do whichever I don't do this year the following year assuming that I get asked back).



____________________
Regards Rob
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 17:36
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
Keith M
Moderator


Joined: 16 Dec 2015
Location: Morton, Near Alfreton, North Derbyshire., United Kingdom
Posts: 1694
Status: 
Offline
"Hobby Holidays" are based near Doncaster, which is about 30 or so miles North of me Toto. Whilst I count myself as an experienced solderer, I've not yet had sufficient experience to call myself an experienced modeller, as I've only built 3 metal kits, although I'm working on it with a few kits "in stock" for the winter months.
Ian isn't quite correct on the location of The Midland Railway centre at Butterley, as it's 5 miles South of me, which makes it around 15 from Chesterfield, bit too far to walk I reckon.:giggle:

Keith.



____________________
I thought I saw a light at the end of the tunnel.........but it was only some swine with a torch, bringing me more work!!!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 18:13
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
jakesdad13
Professional grumpy old git


Joined: 14 Dec 2015
Location: Chesterfield Derbyshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 1721
Status: 
Offline
Hi Toto, do you have a model engineering club anywhere near to you? they may be able to give you some pointers. There are also the model railway clubs in and around Edinborough you might get some help there.
I will send you some magazines I have. There is a step by step tutorial from Ian Rice on brass loco building, one of the best I have ever read.

Cheer's, Pete.



____________________
I found it, honest guv!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 18:26
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
Toto
Founder


Joined: 4 Dec 2015
Location: Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Posts: 8140
Status: 
Offline
Thanks for that Pete.

Think I get back from Cyprus on the 23 rd June next year Rob otherwise distance would not bother me. Not just that, I'm thinking sooner rather than later to be honest.:avatar:

I do have a club in Edinburgh that I have been threatening to visit. :avatar: that's a possibility.

Cheers

Toto



____________________
Sometimes I wish the world was full of Norman Wisdoms. Chaotic ......... Yes, but a world where the sun shines on everyone
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 20 Nov 2017 19:20
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
Rob Pulham
Tight Fisted Yorkshireman


Joined: 15 Sep 2017
Location: The Rhubarb Triangle, United Kingdom
Posts: 270
Status: 
Offline
I did rather think you might be.
To be honest I am not sure what you would learn that you haven't discovered already you just need practice.
The key to successful soldering is:
  • Keep things clean - if in doubt give it a scrub/scrape with something mildly abrasive.
  • Plenty of heat so you can get in warm up the metal, and melt the solder quickly and then get out before other soldered joints start to come apart..
  • Use the least amount of solder possible - it's much easier to add more if needed than it is to remove excess
  • If you are soldering long lengths with the iron. Spot solder along the length first to hold things in place then join up by working either from the middle out or from both ends in. To prevent buckling by overheating the brass.
  • If you don't have a tap near by, keep a tub of cold water handy so that you can dunk the hot item in after each joint is soldered.
  • Get yourself some things to use as heat sinks - self locking tweezers are good but worst case wet tissue works either clip the tweezers to it or just cover the item that you don't want to fall off and the excess heat will be dispersed into the tweezers/tissue keeping the solder cool enough not to melt. 



____________________
Regards Rob
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: 21 Nov 2017 17:12
  PM Quote Reply
8th Post
Keith M
Moderator


Joined: 16 Dec 2015
Location: Morton, Near Alfreton, North Derbyshire., United Kingdom
Posts: 1694
Status: 
Offline
I can't really add anything more to what Rob has said, experience is the key, and you only get that by doing the actual soldering process. I'd say the main thing is in assessing which soldering iron to use for which job, ie, don't use a 100 watt model for small jobs, conversely, using a 25 watt iron for larger area's will mean the solder won't melt and flow properly, as the surrounding material is soaking up most of the heat, meaning not enough left to melt the solder itself. It's a bit like.....little job, little hammer, big job, big hammer!:lol:

If you've any brass fret offcuts, then just practice soldering with them first, until you feel more comfortable in handling the various sizes of iron and judging the heat requirements of different sized bits of scrap to solder together.
Just a thought, are there any small 'craft workshops' (perhaps coppersmiths/tinsmiths etc) in your area Toto, as these are the folks who will be soldering metals on a daily basis? I reckon folks such as these would be happy to give you a few hours of instruction, especially if you 'crossed their palm with silver.'
Keith.



____________________
I thought I saw a light at the end of the tunnel.........but it was only some swine with a torch, bringing me more work!!!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: 21 Nov 2017 19:37
  PM Quote Reply
9th Post
Rob Pulham
Tight Fisted Yorkshireman


Joined: 15 Sep 2017
Location: The Rhubarb Triangle, United Kingdom
Posts: 270
Status: 
Offline
Hi Keith,

Where I use the iron, I only have the one that I use for higher melt soldering which is an 80 watt ERSA solder station. Sso I use this for all jobs large and small. 


I do find that even for small jobs (as long as the bit will fit) the 80 watt iron allows you to get the required heat into the job very quickly so you don't need to linger getting everything else hot. I would be concerned that even for small jobs a 25 watt iron would struggle in 7mm. When I first started in 7mm I had a 40 watt Maplins solder station and that struggled so when I died I went for the 80 watt unit and I have been using it now for 4 or 5 years without issue (I haven't even had to replace the tip which to be fair I did expect to at some point).


I also have a cheapo (£9.99 from Maplins) iron that I use for whitemetal soldering. Apparently it's not good to use the same bit for lowmelt (70 degree) and normal soldering although if you change the bit there is no reason why you couldn't use the same iron.

Last edited on 21 Nov 2017 19:37 by Rob Pulham



____________________
Regards Rob
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 16:11  
This topic is:  Home Page > Platform 1 Model Railway Community > The Learning Zone > Courses & Classes > Soldering Course Top





about cookie files used by this web site

UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2016 Data 1 Systems