Coal delivery

Discussion in 'Dioramas and static displays' started by Bo-Bo, Nov 10, 2019 at 7:15 AM.

  1. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    Hi! My next diorama will have a coal theme to it as the railways played a big part in the delivering of coal.
    As with my recent diorama the plinth size will stay the same, but plan to make a longer one so I can add a loco to my dioramas.
    This diorama will have a coal siding leading to a staithe, there will be a grounded van, a walled area and some ground cover such as paving and grasses.
    I will be adding coal workers and some discarded line side items, my wagon of choice is a L&BR open wagon.
    5725566E-39AF-42F5-9FFB-49476B516F96.jpeg
    As you can see while I wait for my plinth to arrive I have been busy, building and weathering the walls, weathering the track and the grounded van.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019 at 11:51 AM
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  2. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    The weathering work looks really good because it looks realistic, realism can best be created with thin washes of colour starting with the dark tones and overlaying with the lighter ones, this technique will give a good impression of light and shadow effects provided that the dark shadow effect on your diorama all face the same way. A case of taking into account an imaginary Sun.

    Great work all the same Mark. :tophat::thumbs:
     
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  3. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    Hi York Paul thanks for your nice comments and for explaining some weathering techniques to me.
    I think there is a bit of debate when it’s comes to weathering and shadows, I have always been told to start with light colours and then followed by a darker colour.:scratchchin:
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019 at 12:05 PM
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  4. Toto

    Toto I'm best ignored Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Interesting ..... and that is where we all learn something new. Differing techniques. Maybe a few photos to illustrate the various stages of weathering. That would be good for folks to look back on for reference. :thumbs:
     
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  5. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    Toto that sounds like a great idea, when I come to do some weathering on my paved section I will take some pictures of each stage.
     
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  6. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    Hi my plinth arrived yesterday, so I have managed to start adding the painted and weathered walls to the diorama.

    The grounded van has been painted and weathered along with the coal staithe. The paved area will be painted up and weathered some time today.

    I thought I would share a picture of my progress so far.
    B12B61BE-A318-42BB-90FB-ED92E59E3A31.jpeg
     
  7. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Mark,

    Yes it is an interesting debate but allow me to explain my thought process here. Take bricks or stone blocks for example, the original colour of masonry tones are dark by comparison to say cement or limestone pointing so by laying down a dark base it is quite realistic to add lighter tones by overlaying either with a wash or by using the dry brush technique. If you lay in a light base tone colour the over-layers will drown the base colour by the very nature of the pigment tone being deeper, however if you do the opposite the the deep tones will shine through the lighter ones to give a much nicer natural and realistic effect. Check out the bridge parapets on my last diorama build. The best way I can explain is for example take decorating, if you room is painted in a light shade and you wish to repaint into a darker one then a couple of coats will totally obliterate the old colour, but to over-paint a deep tone colour which has a strong hue (say dark brown or maroon) with a light colour say pale cream you will be lucky to attain a full colour with two coats because the older colour will "grin" through the new paint. Trust me I was taught all this stuff years ago at art school when we did life drawing classes to get correct skin tone colours. Soon I shall be starting a new diorama which will involve brick tunnel portals and I'll get a thread going to explain my technique, I'm not saying other folk have got it wrong as its each to their own but rule of thumb its always dark colour first then pick out highlights with increasingly lighter colours.

    cheers

    Yorkie
     
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  8. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    Hi Yorkie I really appreciate you explaining the technique properly to me, I can see why a dark base colour should be used first. I have been doing it the opposite way round with some good results.
    The technique you have explained will be something I will be using from now on.:thumbs:
     
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  9. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Great to know... sharing info to me is as important as the actual modeling. In "fineart" circles the laying down of a deep base colour is known by artists as blocking in, in our modeling world we too are all making art except instead of painting a picture we are making sculpture but dressing it to look correct in the same way artists do when painting pictures. Interestingly this morning on Jeremy Vine Radio 2 I listened to Rod Stuart and Jooles Holland talking about their model railways which were likened by Jeremy Vile as being art pieces, he also said the trend these days was to attain higher and higher levels of realism a bit like the military gaming community do. I thought that was a wonderful thing to say on Radio.
     
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  10. Bo-Bo

    Bo-Bo Full Member

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    I do agree Yorkie as more and more modellers strive to make their models and model railways as realistic as possible.
     

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