Disguising the interface between buildings and ground

Discussion in 'Scenics' started by Toto, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Looking for some tips to help hide the sometimes obvious joint between the base of a building and the ground level. In particular a concrete slab or unmade ground.

    A variation would be good. I was thinking foliage but wouldn't want to use it repetitively.

    Cheers

    Toto
     
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  2. Gary

    Gary Staff Member Administrator Golden Goat 2018

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    This will depend on the entire scene. For example, along your wagon works you could run ballast or road base right up to the base of the building and incorporate clumps of grasses, weeds etc amongst this surface. But, I would recommend taking a drive somewhere to look at the real thing. Get out of the city and look for any sidings that have buildings located next to them.

    These pics I have taken around Rosehill in Sydney gives you some ideas. Any one of these would be suitable up against a wall, building, alongside a road or pathway.

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    IMG_3733.jpg

    IMG_3736.jpg

    IMG_3737.jpg

    Cheers, Gary.
     
  3. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Another way of disguising the joint that I used on Lockoford Yard was to wrap the bottom of the building in clingfilm (Saran wrap), do the ground cover, I used soil sieved onto neat pva. Once dry, I lifted the building, removed the clingfilm and the building sat with very little gap which I placed some weeds etc to disguise. In the petite properties book the author used Das clay rolled thin between two sheets of silicon baking sheet, (approx 2-3mm) for her building cladding. You could probably use the same technique for your concrete base. Cut a straight edge in it while soft and butt it up to the base of your building though I'd roll it a bit thicker, 5-6mm. Make sure you allow for the thickness of the ground cover when working out how tall your buildings are.

    Cheer's, Pete.

    Just had a thought, real concrete slabs are poured in sections, you could probably use a similar technique with Das, lay it in smaller slabs rather than laying it in one go and scribing joints. It may help reduce the cracking too. As it dries and shrinks you will be left with gaps that can be filled later.
     
  4. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Cheers chaps. There is always a way. I could as suggested lay the concrete( clay ) in sections. I could also incorporate a stone border between the concrete and the building as if it were drainage or a soak away.
     
  5. Ron

    Ron Staff Member Moderator

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    At the Pendon Museum, all the buildings sit in ready made 'holes' and can be removed if needed. The buildings are all made with 1"- 2" extra at the base to sit in the holes. Just another man's way of doing it!?

    Ron
     
  6. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Cheers Ron.
     
  7. paul_l

    paul_l Staff Member Administrator

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    On Viccy Rd, I laid a 5mm layer of insulation foam then added brick paper cobblestones and pavements (1 to 1.5 mm card covered in brickpaper,) , then cut out the profile of the building, the building having a 6mm skirt below door level. Or in the case of the Large shop section, the buildings and pavements are one removable lump.

    [​IMG]

    Adding door steps after also helps hide the gaps

    [​IMG]

    On the goods shed I lay 1mm card cut to the building profile then covered the card with brick paper.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Paul
     
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  8. Is Line Clear

    Is Line Clear Full Member

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    Toto this is the way I plant structures on the Elton Crossing Project layout, I laid in a top surface of 4mm cork sheeting which acts as both a cushion for train running and also as an anchor for buildings.The cork is cut away to create the building footprint like shown here on the signal box, the 4mm inset prevents the building from moving accidentally and hides any gaps in the groundworks... of course factor in this measurement when accounting for height.

     
  9. Is Line Clear

    Is Line Clear Full Member

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    Now the front of the same signal box partly dressed with a sleeper lead off beam to take the signal cranks and pulley wheels, the great thing about cork is it can easily be topped off with coloured granules of earthen mixes which eliminates the need for pre-painting of bases.

     
  10. Is Line Clear

    Is Line Clear Full Member

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    And finally the humble garden shed on the crossing keepers allotment, this is surrounded by offcuts of 1.5mm Plasticard cut into the shape of paving slabs and again surrounded with various earth mixes from Jarvis Scenics. The same principles can be applied to any build scene and a carriage works would make an interesting study what with piles of scrap, raw materials, discarded clutter and some weed patches and oil / grease spillages.
     
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  11. Is Line Clear

    Is Line Clear Full Member

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    Paul nice models there, out of interest is Viccy Road in any way inspired by that great Potteries highway that runs down onto Anchor Road under the bowstring bridge at Longton station?... That scenery has a spookily reminiscent feel about it somehow, just the bus should be red and cream for Potteries Motor Traction :avatar:
     
  12. paul_l

    paul_l Staff Member Administrator

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    Nah, too much red brick, used to travel along Victoria Rd or City Rd each day to the old 6th Form college.

    Viccy Rd is a fictitious layout supposed to be in Dundee, on a terminus station for the proposed Circular line - never got built as it was quicker to walk to the center of the city than travel by train around the outside,and those new fangled Omnibus thingies and trams were catching on.

    Paul the other one - the N.Staffs ex-pat living in Scotland rather than York :lol:
     
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