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Discussion in 'Locomotives' started by Wolseley, May 5, 2020.

  1. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    Sometimes you're just in the right place at the right time. One night in 2016 I was on Tempe station waiting for a train and into the platform comes this:

    20160916_192913.jpg

    20160916_193032.jpg

    20160916_193041.jpg
     
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  2. Echidna

    Echidna Full Member

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    Hello All,

    a question, is the NSWGR loco green the same as GNR loco Dark Green ?

    I have been advised that pre WW1 VR loco green was the GNR loco Green ( not sure if dark or light ) but was the result of a Commissioner's visit to London, where the GNR green was later adopted by the VR. ( The purpose of the visit was not related to locomotive liveries, that was just an unintended by product. )

    Subsequently, the VR went over to Canadian Pacific Railway red due to a subsequent Commissioner coming from Canada,

    regards, Echidna
     
  3. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    The green used by the NSWGR was probably closer to GNR green than any other shade, but I'm not sure if it was identical, or if there was any connection whatsoever. I only ever saw one green locomotive in revenue earning service, that being 3813 at Broadmeadow. Locomotives in NSW have mostly been black, with the exception of a colourful period in the 1930s and, in later years with the 38 class, although almost all of them ended up in black. The lining varied over the years - originally I think it was mostly red and greyish white lined black, later simplified to a single thicker red line. There was a strong LNWR influence on the NSWGR from day one. The 1 Class 0-4-2 looked as if they could have been Crewe engines (J E McConnell was the Consulting Engineer) and, up until 1905, most of the top men in the hierarchy were ex-LNWR (most notably E M C G Eddy and William Thow). Yhen, in 1905, the unthinkable happened - a man from the GWR, E E Lucy, who had worked under Churchward, became Chief Mechanical Engineer. The green livery was introduced while Lucy was in charge, but it was, surprisingly, not a Brunswick Green.

    The 1930s also saw the introduction of maroon locomotives and red and cream coaches on the Sydney to Newcastle route, blue locomotives and blue and cream coaches on the Blue Mountains route, and green locomotives and green and cream coaches on the South Coast route.

    I wouldn't take the colours of 3642 as necessarily being accurate as the NSW Rail Transport Museum, aside from being a museum, also operates a tourist steam railway, and have painted some of their operating locomotives in rather inaccurate colours. As far as I recall though, 3642 is pretty much the same colour as 3813 was in 1970, although the night time shot doesn't reproduce the colour too well.

    As a footnote, I would add that there was a tradition, up until the 1950s, that Royal Train engines were painted in (surprise, surprise) Royal Blue.
     
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  4. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    For comparison, here's a photo I took of a rather grubby 3813 at Broadmeadow on 13 May 1970, while it was still in revenue earning service:

    B_013.jpg
     
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  5. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    And for comparison, here are a couple of photos I took of 3642 in June of 1970, on an ARHS (Australian Railway Historical Society) tour from Sydney to Newcastle. Here she is entering Hornsby station:

    ARHS Belmont Tour 1 - 3642 Hornsby - 28 June 1970.jpg

    And taking water at Tuggerah:

    ARHS Belmont Tour 7 - 3642 Tuggerah - 28 June 1970.jpg
     

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