Episode 106 18 The Gormo 3 Link Coupling Pt II

Discussion in 'The Collection' started by gormo, Jun 1, 2018.

  1. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Pete,
    I tried your suggestion about drilling the hook. The hook is really a bit too thin. The flattening out is easy enough but there`s not much left to drill through. I think I`ll stick with the glue it to the sides of the hook method........We have to try these things......nothing ventured, nothing gained......thanks for the suggestion.
    :tophat:Gormo
     
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  2. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Martin,
    Good on you for having a go at the links. It`s easy when you know how.
    I am still not 100% sure about whether to bother with them actually. They certainly look good, but when I`m running a train I need to get down to rail level to appreciate them.......anyway that`s just me nit picking.!!!
    I suppose at the end of the day, when the wagons are sitting around in a yard, a casual look at the couplings at both ends tells the eye that all is complete.
    I think I just answered my own doubts.
    Maybe the next Gormo`s Shed should be about making your own chains...?????? :scratchchin:
    :tophat:Gormo
     
  3. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Folks,
    Some more fine tuning and problem solving with the three link system.
    As you can see in the pic below, it is possible for the chain to rotate through 180 degrees in the horizontal plane.
    The chain usually does does not get to the extreme ends of the arc, however given the right circumstances it can happen.
    When pushing 4, 5 or 6 or more small wagons, it usually will not happen, however when you add more weight / resistance to the train, instead of the chain pushing the wagons, it follows the path of least resistance to either end of the arc and we get buffer lock and derailment. This situation usually only arises when pushing through an "S" point formation.

    DSC06026_v1.JPG

    So how do we stop the chain from reaching the point of no return. ? In other words, limit it`s range of movement with creating a new problem. Some movement is required, but probably a range of about 90 degrees would be sufficient.
    So trial and error has resulted in the split pin chain anchor being converted over to an anchor and hook arrangement.


    I should point out that now that the chain links are being silver soldered as well. Silver solder is five times stronger than standard solder. Some of my soldering is not as neat as it could be thanks to cruel close ups.
    This is how the new arrangement looks. When the chain is in the horizontal position / connected, the up facing hook restricts the swing of the chain down to an arc of about 90 degrees rather than the original of 180 degrees.


    You can see more clearly here in the overhead shot


    The result is quite effective and when you reach that point where the chain would normally travel into dangerous territory, the up facing hook stops it and directs the forces forward in the direction of the movement of the train.
    A bonus with this method is that you have a hook at either end of the wagon that can be used to connect to a chain. This is particularly helpful for attaching a brake van the wrong way around or running around with a loco.
    The pic below shows two up facing hooks connected.



    I have also adopted the dummy chain for the other end of the wagon. The links are non magnetic , made at home and held on the hook with a tiny drop of Superglue. It just balances out the look of the system


    So there you are folks.......this would definitely have to be classified as a work in progress.

    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
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  4. Beetleton MPD

    Beetleton MPD Full Member

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    Gormo, just a request for further information...
    Did you implement this mod across most/all of your rolling stock and is it still working out as a practical option?
    I ask this as I am in the throws of rebuilding my layout to incorporate a more satisfying operational system and I have tried several coupling systems through 'hook & bar', via 'Sprat & Winkle' to Kadee etc. but although I have incorporated your system to only 3 vehicles so far, I am interested in whether I ought to pursue the change to more of my wagon stock for the future...
    Cheers, Martin Jackson in an Autumnal Central Portugal
     
  5. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Martin,
    Sorry for the late reply as I have been traveling on hols.......just got back home last night.
    First of all......the decision to go ahead is entirely up to you.
    I guess you are like me in pursuit of that system that will work perfectly in all situations and as far as I can tell, no system is yet what we would call " Perfect "
    I am quite happy with my system as it stands. I feel it needs to be made commercially to achieve a higher level of consistency in the parts.......either that or I need to develop a couple of jigs myself to bring it up to speed.
    That said.......it works fine but with limitations. Pushing a rather long train.........maybe 15 wagons.???.....through an " S" point formation could test it on occasion and possibly result in a derailment, however not necessarily.
    So I have come to the conclusion that this system as it stands at the moment is best suited to a shunting plank arrangement where train length is quite shorter. It will work at 95% efficiency in that situation.......shunting a handful of wagons etc.
    In my situation with a roundy, roundy layout, I am generally trying to run trains as long as the system will allow. Now I am willing to persevere with this system for my own sake, yet when trialing it with my little Grandsons ( 7 and 5 yrs.) they don`t yet have their motor skills developed enough to use the system properly. Actually they struggle a bit with tension locks but not to the same degree.
    I know as they grow older they will be able to use it effectively, but the frustration on their faces concerns me at the moment, so I am wondering which way to turn. The railway is being built with them in mind too, so at the moment I have paused and not converted any more wagons and I am taking time to re-consider whether I should go ahead or not.
    From this extended blurb above you will gather that it`s horses for courses. The system may work well in a shunting plank situation but possibly not so good where long trains are involved. Small children will struggle with it in either situation.
    I guess the answer for you is in trials. If you have tested it extensively and you are happy with how it works, it would be worth going ahead.
    The answer for me is time.......when the little fellas are a bit older they will be fine, so maybe I need to hang on for a while and implement it at a later date.
    I hope this has been helpful Martin.
    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
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  6. Beetleton MPD

    Beetleton MPD Full Member

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    That was a quick reply Gormo, and thanks for that.
    My 'new 00 layout' will be an 'L' with the main board being 3.8m x 1.0m which will feature a country station and a small yard and the board at right-angle will also be scenic leading to a 5 track 3m long fiddle yard. Min radius hopefully will be about 1.2m and station supporting nothing longer than 5 carriages. Goods trains will be no longer than 9 wagons so I shall now put a rake together modified with Gormo 3 link couplings and see how they perform.
    Regretfully my large layout has now been 'taken down', basically it was too large for me to operate satisfactorily by myself, my operating friend passed away in September and now that I am coming up to my 80th I need to get as much fun with the model as I can, hence the rebuild...
    I am a frequent visitor to the website and thank you and all members for the advice that is published there!
     
  7. Peter Watson

    Peter Watson Full Member

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    Hi Gormo,

    Greetings from the UK, and to say how fantastic your three link couplings are. So much so that I am about to start making a set of jigs to convert my entire goods wagon stock to these...………………………. BUT, where to buy the chain???

    It would appear that Ribtex and Spotlight only supply to Australia and NZ, and no where else!!!! aaggggghhhhh.

    I do, however, have relatives in Tauranga, NZ. They have already sent me some chain Ribtex JF438, advertised as 4mm X 3mm, but I think it is too small.

    Can you confirm that the chain is, "Ribtex, JF435." This is shown on the Ribtex site as 6mm X 3mm.

    They are planning on doing a shopping trip for me this weekend.

    Your help is greatly appreciated.

    Blessings,

    Pete.
     
  8. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Pete,
    I no longer have the packaging for the chain. My chain is Ribtex but seems to be a size in between the two mentioned, as mine is 5mm in length.
    I most likely would have bought the JF435 based on a more rectangular shape according to the size on the packet, however the actual size is another thing altogether.
    The important thing of course is that it is iron core, and if it becomes a problem finding the correct size ready made, the other alternative is to make your own from wire.
    If you can make a former from a length of metal or a strip of wood, you can wrap the wire around the former tightly, as if you were making a spring.
    You just need to cut along one side of the wire whilst it`s wrapped around the former and this will create a number of individual links.
    I think the easiest way is to go shopping with a magnet in hand, and check out retailers who sell chain. Don`t be too influenced by the size stated on the packet, but rather go by the look of it and assess visually whether you think it would be suitable and check it with the magnet.
    It seems to me that most chains are produced in China and the size printed on the packaging is not so much an accurate measurement but rather a ball park figure where close enough will do.
    I would not be surprised to see variations in different batches of the same product.
    Good luck with your efforts........the system is a lot of fun when you get it going...........but I would suggest you start with just a couple of wagons and do some serious testing before committing to your whole fleet.
    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
  9. Peter Watson

    Peter Watson Full Member

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    Hi Gormo,

    Wow, thanks for the speedy reply.

    I will ask my relatives to send me some packs of JF435.

    I take your advice regarding converting a handful of wagons first.

    I'll let you know.

    Keep up the good work. Great site.

    Blessings,

    Pete.
     

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