Installing Station and Street Lighting

Discussion in 'DC Control' started by Wolseley, Apr 9, 2020.

  1. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    I was thinking about installing street lights around my station building, platform lights and possibly lights in the building (which is not the same as saying I actually will end up doing it). After looking at what’s out there, although I am attracted to Woodland Scenics’ “Just Plug” system, I find their lights rather clumsy and more suited to a public park than a railway. They do have the benefit though of not needing an extensive knowledge of electrics (ideal for me) and you presumably just buy the bits, which are all compatible, connect them all up and there’s your lights - and Woodland Scenics recommend using 16-20 volts AC or 24 volts DC, which is no problem, as I can use the auxiliary output on my controller.

    What appear to me to be the best looking lights on the market are those by DCC Concepts. What I can’t figure out is how to power them. DCC Concepts say that they recommend 4-6V regulated DC for the lights and, as their power unit gives out 18 volts DC, I assume that it is meant for some of their other products. The auxiliary output on my controller gives out 16 volts AC, so that’s not much use either. They do have some information on their website, but it is curiously unhelpful and looks like just a copy of an old advertisement. So how do you get 4-6V regulated DC? I note that they suggest that an old mobile phone charger would be ideal but don’t say how to adapt it and, in any case, I need the only old mobile phone charger I have for my old mobile phone.

    So, if I were to buy some of these lights, can anyone (politely) tell me what I should do with them?
     
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  2. Mr Porter

    Mr Porter Failure is always an option. Full Member

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    Before you commit to DCC Concepts lights, (all their stuff is very very good but very very expensive), I would have a look at Kytes Lights (https://www.kyteslights.com/) the website pictures are pretty awful . The other people I would recommend are Model Rail UK, (https://modelrailuk.co.uk/product-category/00-gauge/00-street-and-station-lights/). I have no connection to either company.
    With regards to power, a variable power supply (3-12V DC) will cost less than £10.

    :headbanger:
    Jim
     
  3. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    Thanks for that.

    I am rather taken with some of the lights that Kytes Lights have. I think I'll get some for around the station building and, if it works out as I am hoping, maybe get a bit more adventurous and do some more.

    The power supply I will have to get locally, as I need it to be suitable for Australian/New Zealand power points. I have never seen one of these things before so, before I purchase one, can I ask you to confirm that this is the sort of thing you were talking about? It does look rather like a mobile phone charger:

    [​IMG]

    Regards.

    Jim
     
  4. MalcT

    MalcT Full Member

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  5. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    In the UK at least, this type of power supply is often called a "Wall Wart" (perhaps unkindly!). Here in the UK, Ebay has plenty of cheap ones both variable and fixed voltages, and I'd imagine the Aussie Ebay will have plenty of similar ones with your Australian standard pin arrangements......they'll doubtless ALL be made in China anyway! The higher the mA output, the more LED lights a unit will run, and it would be best to have a Bus type arrangement under your layout so that you can 'tap off' easily to each light. If you have a multimeter it would be a good idea to check the total load current to the lighting circuit to ensure you don't overload the 'Wall Wart', depending on your intended total number of lights you may possibly need more than one 'Wart' so buying the highest current output one available might be your best option.
    Keith.
     
  6. Wolseley

    Wolseley Full Member

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    Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. After looking at what the various retailers have to offer, I bought some platform lights, yard lights, street lights and a building lighting kit from Kytes Lights. I shall source the power supply locally.

    Jim
     
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  7. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Full Member

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    4-6v

    sounds like 4x AA batteries? 1.5v each.
     

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