Is it a matter of preference

Discussion in 'General Information' started by Oddjob, Apr 2, 2021.

  1. Oddjob

    Oddjob Full Member

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    :hismiley:with me being new to this hobby I see many different pictures of weathered and non weathered locomotives and wagons.
    Is this a matter of preference for fellow modellers. What do you prefer.:scratchchin:
     
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  2. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    To me weathering is an artform and as such is totally subjective, personally I like to see all forms of weathering (not just locos and rolling stock but buildings too) as long as its done sympathetically and evenly... now't worse than something badly overcooked shall we say :avatar:. My own style of weathering is to attempt what I call SuperReal... but that's just me.:thumbs:
     
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  3. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    A lot depends on what you want to portray on your layout, as a newcomer to the hobby I would recommend you have a good look at what others have done. There are some seriously gifted modellers out there and they give the impression that it looks fairly easy to achieve a look of the real thing. They've had years of practice and have honed the art to the best it can get. They are inspirational, but can lead to great frustration when your own attempts don't match up as I've found to my own dismay. It hasn't put me off, I will still try and do my best but for some reason locos still don't look as good as my rolling stock so yes it can raise the realism of the layout and models but it is a learning curve. If you fancy having a go, try weathering powders first, if you're not happy with the result, they are easy to wash off, don't put your favorite loco under the tap though!!!

    Cheers, Pete.
     
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  4. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    I agree with Pete Oddjob,
    All I would suggest is that if you decide to go down the weathering route, get hold of some old rolling stock.......possibly damaged......doesn`t matter...but something that can be sacrificed in the name of learning to weather and acquiring a technique.
    As Pete said....weathering powders are a good way to start as they can be washed off and because of that fact, you can start again on the same piece of rolling stock and begin to understand how this weathering works.
    There are four things you need.........information and practice, practice, practice.
    :tophat:Gormo
     
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  5. paul_l

    paul_l Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi

    Rather than risking an expensive model, I'd suggest buying some cheap second hand wagons, or try the old Airfix kits now made by Dapol, and practice on these.
    If you use acrylic paints, then you can use neat Dettol (the original Brown stuff), to strip the paint off and try again. May not be the correct scale, but as Gormo and Pete have said practice is practice.

    Personally I prefer lightly weathered, rather than late BR steam totally manky, but it's what you want.

    Paul
     
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  6. Gary

    Gary Wants more time for modelling.... Staff Member Administrator

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    I like to weather my models, whether that be locomotives and rolling stock or buildings and vehicles. I personally think they all need some sort of treatment. One of the best things to use when weathering is photos, preferably colour photos of what you intend to weather. Please don't just use one photo, if you can obtain several, the better.
    I have used various methods over the years from air brush to weathering powders to chalks and pastels. Generally I go for what gives the best result and that most of the time I like to dull the model down with thinned white paint through an air brush, then use some oil paints and washes for rust and streaking and lastly I followed up with the use of weathering powders.

    As Gormo and Pete have already stated, practice makes perfect !

    Cheers, Gary.
     
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  7. Oddjob

    Oddjob Full Member

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    Thanks to all for the informative replies. I know it all depends on what era you are trying to achieve.
     
  8. Jim Freight

    Jim Freight Full Member

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    My era is freight in the 1960's, so hauled by BR steam and green diesel.

    I prefer light weathering (some medium) such that the item is in daily but maintained use but not ready for the breakers yard, even though some of the older steamers would have been in that state. Mind you, at that time many active steam locos would be extremely filthy as the demise of steam approached.

    So not as bad as it would have been, but more how it could have looked with many years of steam to go and some pride in appearance as seen in the big 4 days.

    Jim :scratchchin:
     
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  9. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    I much prefer to weather as aside from even new stock having a patina of dirt after only a few miles in service weathering them creates individuality in your models.

    Yes, you might have the same RTR locos and stock as your mates (if RTR stock is your particular fancy) but by weathering them they become yours. No matter how hard someone tries they will never weather them exactly the same as yours.

    When I first returned to modelling, weathering was a dark art and I used to get my good lady to weather my stock for me (she's an artist). I soon decided to try myself and found that I thoroughly enjoy it. I too use acrylics and as well as using Dettol to strip completely (by the way the cheapo Coop equivalent works too) you can also remove small sections with Isopropyl Alcohol or Methylated Spirits on a cotton bud. They are both quite aggressive but if you dilute them a little with water, you soon find the best 'solution' for removing just enough without ruining the overall effect. As long as you keep the solution in a sealed jar it lasts a long time.
     
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  10. Oddjob

    Oddjob Full Member

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    Rob thanks for explaining a little bit of your weathering process, I'm certain through time I will start weathering.
     
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  11. class48nswfan

    class48nswfan Full Member

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    I think weathered stock looks much better than out of the box shiny. Have managed to reasonably weather some stock and completely botch up others. Still learning and find it quite relaxing thing to do. I think the trick is not to overweather. Dave
     
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