Jakesdads workbench.

Discussion in 'Workshop Benches' started by jakesdad13, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    That's a cracking stop block there Pete... it looks similar to the ones in Stoke NW Yard :tophat::thumbs:
     
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  2. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Nice work Pete.
     
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  3. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Two coats of primer.
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    Two coats of sleeper grime.
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    It looks very light but it is a mucky rusty brown, honest!

    Cheer's, Pete.
     
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  4. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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  5. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    They are definitely a nice set of castings with very little cleaning up to do, plus they fit together well. I have two more to build but I need to crack on with the layout before then, plus repair my 3 way point, one of the switch blades has come adrift and I will need to replace the tie bar as the copper cladding has come off :facepalm::mad:.

    Pete.
     
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  6. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Oh dear Pete that is frustrating, I know with my C&L points I though I'd be clever and scratch build tiebars using their shoe connectors to the switch blades, what a fiddly and time consuming process. I used thin brass etch strip as the tie bar as I didn't like the copper clad which came with the kit, insulation was made by cutting and bending the tie bar into two L shapes and gluing together using a thin strip of plasticard as insulator. So far it works well.
     
  7. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    York Paul and I were having a conversation about his wobbly wagon on Totos thread. So rather than post on there I thought it best to do a separate how to on my workshop thread.
    Anyway the gist of the conversation was I had the same problem a while ago and this is how I over came it.
    I built this wagon a long time ago as the price indicates. When I had finished and plonked it on the track it wobbled and when running over points it would derail. It came close to getting launched out of the window.
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    Any way, I pulled the offending axle and wheel set out and cut the ends off the axle where they fit into the axle boxes. I then cut some 6mm x 0.5mm brass strip bent it into a c shape to fit over the axle between the wheels. After very careful measuring I then cut a short bit of round brass wire approx 1.5mm about 20/25mm long and soldered it to the brass strip. I also drilled and fitted some 1/8" axle bearings.
    Next up I found some approx 1/4" ABS square rod with a 1.5mm hole running through it and cut two short lenghts and slid them onto the brass wire each side of the rocker and glued them to the wagon base. The ABS plastic is a swine to glue as ordinary solvent doesn't touch it, at the time I did it I used a solvent I got from work, I cannot remember its name but I remember it was vicious. I think plumbers solvent works on it though.
    I haven't found any of the original rod but here is a bit of half round channel made of the same stuff.
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    Now some close ups of the finished article.
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    It's important to measure carefully before cutting and drilling so as not to finish with a wagon higher at one end than 'tother!

    I hope this has been of help and interest, it doesn't have to be a cure for a wobbly wagon on its own, it can be fitted as a compensation as its built.

    Cheer's, Pete.
     
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  8. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Great thread Pete, I totally see how your compensation device works now and thanks for posting. The attractive thing here is that this can be made up from stuff out of the bits box... so its an attractive, simple and economical way of solving what otherwise has been an aggravating problem. :tophat:
     
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