Keyser "Lord Nelson" build. (An antique in the making maybe?)

Discussion in 'Kits, Kit bashes & Scratch builds' started by Keith M, Oct 12, 2019.

  1. ianvolvo46

    ianvolvo46 Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    4,319
    Likes Received:
    713
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2015
    up there with your interesting threads Keith thanks :thumbup::thumbup:

    Ian vt
     
  2. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    3,289
    Likes Received:
    869
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    I'm following this build with interest Keith. If it go's the same as your previous builds it will turn out well!
    Would you recommend the Poppies chassis jig? I've been fancying something like that for a while now.

    Cheer's, Pete.
     
    York Paul likes this.
  3. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    3,134
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Keith definitely pulled a rabbit out of the hat with his Fell diesel build... that one was certainly a build not for the faint hearted. :tophat::cheers: If there was ever an award for the most adventurous kit build on Platform 1 then that would get it.:thumbup:
     
    Mr Porter likes this.
  4. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Yes Paul, it is indeed a "Poppy" jig. It might not be quite as good as some of the proprietary metal ones but it's perfectly adequate for my very 'Amateur' use, and certainly vastly cheaper. If I were to be building loco's for others, I'd go for a pricier option, but that's not likely to happen.:giggle:
     
    York Paul likes this.
  5. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    The "Poppy" jig is fine for 'Amateur' use Pete, "does exactly what it says on the tin"!
    Keith.
     
    jakesdad13 likes this.
  6. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    3,134
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Thanks Keith for that advice, I may get a jig as some point if only to speed the builds up a little, the way i put a chassis together is using a flat stone, a mirror and a piece of graph paper... the old fashioned way. I've got four steamers built this way ranging from a simple 0-4-4 to a 4-6-2 Pacific and they are all free rolling and perfectly level. Same goes for the diesel bogies, there are two on the workbench right now to be finalised over the weekend and they are as straight as a die.
     
    jakesdad13 likes this.
  7. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Mmmmmmm, not sure about 'adventurous' Paul. It certainly wasn't a simple straightforward kit in the form I built it, but that didn't put me off, just slowed me down somewhat whilst I devised a "work-around' to cover the lack of instructions for the 'late' version. I usually rise to a challenge, and I get a lot of satisfaction from completion of what can be termed a more awkward/difficult kit, after all, if you don't attempt these more challenging kits, you'll never know the limit of your capabilities, sort of "nothing ventured, nothing gained"!
    I've not done with the Fell yet, as I'm determined to make it capable of taking reasonable curves, otherwise there'd be no point in my building it, as I build them to use, not sit in a cabinet, but it's a model I'm glad to leave for a while to maybe get my sanity back somewhat.........the "Lord Nelson", despite it being an old style kit has at least gone some way to restore my interest, mojo and sanity!:avatar:

    Keith.
     
    jakesdad13 likes this.
  8. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Back on thread, here's the (now painted) chassis with wheels, motor and gearbox(!) in place. The worm drive is brass but unfortunately the drive gear is plastic (Aaaaghhh!). Not sure if that will be up to the job long term, so replacement with a 'proper' motor/gearbox might not be too far away!

    IMG_5799.JPG

    Wheels are plastic centres with what seems to be aluminium tyres. They look clean enough (straight out of sealed shrink wrapping) but not sure if they may tarnish in the long term. The wires are just a 'lash-up' for testing purposes. At least as the axles are 'D' shaped, 3 wheels 90 degrees out of phase with the other 3, then there's no hassle involved in quartering, and at this point, it ran nicely without problems.......wether the same will be true when the valve gear is fitted remains to be seen!:giggle:
     
    Dublo and jakesdad13 like this.
  9. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    I've been spending some time on the loco body recently, and have just primer coated the pretty much completed body. As usual, the first primer coat shows up a few bits that need a touch more fettling, but it's getting there. I used brass handrail knobs rather than the supplied plastic ones, again something I'm personally not keen on, and I may as well do it right.

    IMG_3800.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
    MalcT, Dublo and jakesdad13 like this.
  10. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Made a start on the dreaded valve gear today! Instructional detail isn't that great (but then again, nor is my valve gear knowledge!) but I'll keep plugging on anyway. The various rods are supposed to be riveted together, but if you've ever seen the size of these rivets you'll know that fixing them is fraught with difficulty, not to mention being able to actually see them! That being so, I decided my usual method would make things much easier so some time ago, I obtained a small plastic box of 1000 brass Lacemaking pins, 0.5mm in diameter and 10mm long. First step is to decide which way around the various parts are to be fixed, then the rivet hole in the rearmost part is 'countersunk' with a small drill, probably around 2mm diameter will be about right. the brass pin is then inserted through the various parts, with a thin piece of paper which the pin passes through between each part, thus forming a sandwich. Next step is to solder the pin to the rearmost rod using as little solder as possible to fill up the 'countersunk' area. Finally, snip off the excess pin length, file flat to the back of the rod, tear off the interleaving bits of paper and if you've done it properly, all rods should move easily......at least, that's the theory of it! I've now got the first 4 joints done, and all is good so far.

    IMG_5296.JPG
     

Share This Page