My "Fell Diesel" build....maybe a 'build too far?"

Discussion in 'Kits, Kit bashes & Scratch builds' started by Keith M, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    I've now made a good start on my Judith Edge Models 'Fell Diesel', and as will be seen as it progresses, it's not a simple kit, and in fact the instructions state "This is an extremely complex kit, study the drawings, parts and instructions carefully before starting".........Gulp!
    Have I taken on more than my ability can cope with? Well I guess time will tell, and I won't be shy of shouting for help/advice on this forum if I'm sliding into the soft and brown stuff with it as with my recent post regarding the compensating hornblock issue. I've now taken the plunge and cut out the chassis for the hornblocks, even though the chassis markings which (according to the instructions, they should be) are not there, so if I make a pigs ear of it, I'll have to cut a new set of chassis members. However, in true 'Plank across the backside' manner, I took the precaution of marking out spares on some brass sheet! Anyway, to refresh the memories of those who might be interested, here's where it started from.

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  2. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    ......and the other bits.

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  3. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    So off we go with the build. As stated, I've cut out the chassis for "High Level" hornblocks, so next was to assemble the chassis inner frames (there are inner and outer frames on this loco) with the provided spacers (00 and EM provided), and for this you really need either two pairs of hands or plenty of 'Kirbigrips' (purloined from the Wife maybe?) as it's VERY easy to unsolder one spacer whilst attempting to solder another in, especially if, like me, you are soldering with the gas torch. Here's the 'inner chassis' ready for hornblocks, which will doubtless be lots of fun (Not!)

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  4. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    In between times, I've also assembled the two bogies. These are made up by laminating 4 separate parts together for each side of each bogie frame, then soldering each frame to a bogie frame spacer and finally a wire stretcher at each end. The trick again, as with the chassis, is to solder each frame to the spacer without each frame unsoldering itself at the same time, not easy, especially as I didn't want to use different melting point solders. Here they are with wheels temporarily assembled and ready for cleanup and painting.

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    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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  5. Toto

    Toto I'm best ignored Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Nice clean job there Keith. The etches look very nice indeed. I'm looking forward to seeing this come together. Im sure we have the experience on board if you start to wallow in the brown stuff
    I personally have every faith oh great assembler of pieces. :avatar::tophat::thumbs:
     
  6. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    Also made up the connecting rods which will be needed to space the bearings/hornblocks in the chassis itself, again made up from just 2 laminations soldered together. In the pic is the platform which will in time be mounted onto the completed chassis, buffer beams turned up and facing etches soldered on. So far, so good!

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  7. Ron

    Ron Staff Member Moderator

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    Looking good Keith! :thumbup:
     
  8. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Excellent work there Keith... now where have I seen etch shapes like that before :avatar: ... really looking forward to following this build :tophat::tophat:
     
  9. SBt

    SBt Full Member

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    Take it this is 00?
     
  10. Toto

    Toto I'm best ignored Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    You'll have it built in no time. Just go easy with it and I'm sure you'll get there.
     
  11. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes Steve, it's an '00' gauge 'Judith Edge' kit.
    Keith.
     
  12. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    Got a little more progress this afternoon. I have one of those plastic cases of various sizes of compression and expansion springs, and found the ideal size of compression spring I was looking for. Cut into 4 pieces so as to push the hornblocks/bearings outwards onto the inner edge of the frames, it holds them in position for soldering. I'm building this kit as the later 'modified' version of the Fell, the 4-4-4-4 version, but connecting rods are also supplied to build the 4-8-4 earlier version, so I used these rods, suitably reamed out, to fit onto the loco axles, thus holding the hornblocks/bearings in position for soldering the 'yoke' of the hornblocks to the frames, but that's for another day. Here's where I'm at presently.

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  13. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Nice work mate, you won't worry as much with the next project!
    You will soon be scratchbuilding models that there are no kits or rtr for.

    Pete.
     
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  14. Toto

    Toto I'm best ignored Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Good shout with the springs Keith :thumbs: you are tackling this with no issues. I think you will have a great loco at the end of the build. :tophat:
     
  15. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Hi Keith,

    Use your Kirkby grips as heat sinks to stop parts coming adrift. If you clip them onto parts adjacent to where you are soldering, they will absorb enough heat to stop the previously soldered parts from moving.

    Looking excellent by the way:tophat:
     
  16. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Rob.
    Yes, I already use the 'Kirbigrips' as heat sinks, I also have a couple of larger food stainless steel food bag clips (like overgrown crocodile clips!), in fact, anything I can get my hands on to either hold things in place for soldering, or as heat sinks. I'm presently wrestling with chassis problems as it's obvious to me now that the designer has not attempted a compensated build with the 'High Level' gearbox and dual drive setup. It's not possible without considerable modification (as I'm finding!) due to things like brake shoe support wires passing through the chassis obstruct the fitting of the gearbox, the middle bottom spacer has to be removed otherwise there isn't sufficient clearance to actually fit the gearbox, and the chassis outer frames have no allowance for 'up & down' movement required for a compensated chassis, and that's just for starters! Since the instructions clearly state (and parts are provided on the etch) that compensation is an option (but there are NO instructions as to how to proceed) I'm progressing slowly on a "Suck-it-and-see" basis. I have to say that I'm less than impressed, but we'll see how the rest of the job goes.
    Keith.
     
  17. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    IMG_1465.JPG I'm slowly creeping forward with this project, and think (hope!) i've sorted the chassis problems now. I removed the large central spacer under the chassis which now gives space to fit the 'High Level' gearbox with it's dual drive setup, the brake shoe support wires which formerly passed right through the chassis and also obstructed fitting of gearbox/dual drive setup have been cut back to clear, and the hornblocks from the two central sets of drive wheels have been completely removed, replaced by thin brass frets soldered onto the outside of the inner chassis at each side, marked up and drilled/reamed to take new brass axle bushes and all checked out using the connecting rods as spacers, but leaving each outer pair of drive wheels with a small amount of up/down suspension movement, restricted by the outer chassis frames, but enough to still be compensated. At this point it's now ready for a good scrub up prior to etch primer and undercoat, followed by satin black finish coat.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2019
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  18. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    The bits of cocktail stick fitted through the bearings (they're 2mm on this loco) are to prevent any paint getting in the bearings.

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  19. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    In between times (and to help preserve my sanity if there's any left by now!) I made a start on assembling the body, which in itself is also quite a complex assembly, the main shell being constructed from 3 main parts, central and a cab/engine housing each end, then butt soldered together, which isn't easy. The radiator grille assemblies at each end are made up of 25 thin strips of fret about 2mm wide and 28mm long which have to be threaded onto two 0.4mm brass wires, all then soldered into a small rectangular frame with the thin strips soldered to the frame around the edges, whilst keeping them spaced equally. This is then soldered into the surround which has to be annealed and sharply bent at each side to solder into each side of the engine housing, something of a patience tester. There have, I admit, been times when I've wondered why I went into 00 gauge rather than 0, as if nothing else, at least the parts would be bigger and maybe easier to solder, still, one has to soldier (or should that be 'solder' on!) This is the body shell with most of the overlays and other parts fitted, still some way to go, and thanks to a combination of the phosphoric acid flux and my slightly sticky fingers after attaching some parts with Araldite, the shell now needs a damn good clean up, but at least it's beginning to look like a locomotive! Nose mouldings at each radiator top are resin castings, all else is brass fret so far.

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  20. ianvolvo46

    ianvolvo46 Staff Member Moderator

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    Your a brave and clever man Keith :tophat:great thread as well :thumbup:

    Ian vt
     

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