Peco O Gauge Chassis Kit

Discussion in 'Workshop Benches' started by Kimbo, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi,One of the challenges fitting Winterley couplings to Locomotives is the coupling hook end, which is quite a large unit to fit. The loop end is straight forward, requiring just two small holes drilled in the buffer beam, but on some locomotives, ie the class 02 diesel and the Hudswell Clarkes, fitting the hook end would involve a fair amount of surgery to the locomotive bodywork. So I've decided to use a wagon permanently attached to what would be the hook end of the locomtives using the three link coupling and then attaching the Winterley hook to the other end of the wagon.
    I've already built one GWR shunter's wagon, a white metal kit, but will need a few more wagons, so I've bought 4x Peco BR chassis Kits to try and see if I can produce a small 9ft wagon. So heres today's "little" project.
    [​IMG]
    Very straight forward instructions.
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    4 main parts go together in seconds, they clip into slots very easily.
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    The wheels have full suspension when fitted as the springs are made from a flexible material which adds just enough tension to hold the wheels down on uneven track-work.
    [​IMG]

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    Small brass inserts go into the buffer housings. Why Slaters and Parkside don't do this is a shame as this is a very nice easy push fit.
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    The spring mechanism again is a great method of spring the coupling hook at the same time as the buffers requiring just a small drop of super glue on the end of the buffer to secure the brass "screw" head, then when set using tweezers to lift the spring wire into the groove

    [​IMG]

    To me this is easily the nicest and simplest way to build up the buffer beam and also the buffers are set at the correct distance with no adjusting small nuts at the rear to get them the same working distance then having to secure the small nuts from coming off during use with a dab of locktight
    [​IMG]

    Now to try and turn it into a type of 1 Plank shunter's wagon. The sides where built up from three strips of plasticard glued together to give the required thickness, then glued to the wagon.

    [​IMG]
    Once glue had set a piece of Lead Flashing was cut to size.

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    This adds enough weight to drop the wagon slightly on its suspension [​IMG]

    Next out with the ruler and Olfa scribing knife to try and turn the lead into planked flooring. Two passes with the knife on each line gives a good effect.
    [​IMG]

    Still requires cleaning up, but I think you can see the idea. The Winterley coupling is still to be fitted as Ive run out of stock. They should be on thre way from the UK
    [​IMG]
     
  2. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Nice project, I have only built one Peco 7mm wagon kit and I can confirm they are well thought out and assemble into a very nice model :thumbup:.

    Pete.
     
  3. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Pete, which model did you build? Reason I ask is that I'm thinking about buying the box van kit
    Kim
     
  4. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    It was the Iron Ore wagon, actually, it was the first O gauge model I ever built! it went together so well it set me off on the path to where I am now :lol:, if only all O gauge or for that matter any scale models were so easy to build!

    Pete.
     
  5. Steve Fay

    Steve Fay Full Member

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    They are nice wagon kits designed by Richard Webster who now has lion heart trains and is the project development manager for Dapol
     
  6. Gary

    Gary Wants more time for modelling.... Staff Member Administrator

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    Just a question on O gauge kits, where or which retailer is the preferred choice for buying from ??

    Cheers, Gary.
     
  7. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Gary,
    I got my chassis kits from Hattons, but they don't seem to stock the other wagons. Osbourns models uk and gauge master are showing the whole range in stock and they deduct the VAT.
    Kim
     
  8. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Tower models also do specials on Parkside and Slaters kits when you buy several and again they deduct the VAT
     
  9. Gary

    Gary Wants more time for modelling.... Staff Member Administrator

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    Thanks Kim. I did notice Hattons lack of O gauge kits compared to the Dapol and Heljan RTR offerings. I'll take a look athe the other retailers you mentioned.

    Cheers, Gary.
     
  10. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Kim, this is my iron ore wagon.
    [​IMG]

    I dug it out yesterday, I had forgotten about the springing on the suspension, it will need a lot of weight in it to make it work how it should though.

    Cheers, Pete.
     
  11. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Pete, nice looking wagon. If your not going to put a load in it then a piece of lead flashing as I've used should do the trick. I think I'm going to order two box van as I'm impressed with the running of the chassis kits. These can then replace two Parkside ones I purchased second hand which need a bit of talc.
    Kim
     
  12. SMR CHRIS

    SMR CHRIS Staff Member Moderator

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    Nice shunter truck Kim great idea using the lead flashing as a floor and the scribing has come up a treat, the posed set up with the tools and sundries is going to look great when finished and painted

    Can I suggest testing with a spare piece of lead, adding some "timber grain", possibly by lightly brushing along the length of the scribed boards with a suitable wire brush or some corse grit sand paper to add some grain/ distressed timber look.

    Keep us posted with this one more photos as you progress.
     
  13. paul_l

    paul_l Staff Member Administrator

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    If needed, you could add extra lead between the sole bars on the under frame.

    What is the recommended weight for a wagon in O gauge ?

    Paul
     
  14. Kimbo

    Kimbo Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Paul,
    Having done a bit of research on the net it seems that there is no definitive weight for all wagons.
    The GOG manual does not have a recommend weight, it suggests that the weight should be in line with the total length of the wagon, ie 1 gram per mm of length, but does state a minimum weight of 125 grams. The other thing to consider is if you had heavy white metal kits on the end of a long train, with Parkside or Slaters plastic wagons in front of them, with no weight or very little then the chances of a derailment on tight curves, of the lighter wagons is increased. It seems the more important issue is to keep the weight of all wagons the same or as close to as possible.I think that with a small shunting plank that the weight is not so much an issue as long as the wagons run well on the track work. A case of less weight if the track work is perfect and more weight if it is not.The single sheet of roofing lead that I use in my open wagons is approx 75 grams and this gives smooth running over a couple of "not so good" track sections.The other thing to consider is if the wagons have any type of "suspension" built in to the design. The Peco chassis above runs extremely well with no weight added . I have a van fitted with Bill Bedford's spring axle sets, and that runs well with 150 grams.........I'm sure others will have their own ideas on this subject
    Kim
     
  15. paul_l

    paul_l Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi Kim

    Many years ago, when I was a member of a model railway club, they used 1oz (25g) per axel (for 4mm) as a minimum, but again tended to use a whitemetal wagon as the yard stick for a layout that most other wagons should be close to.

    Heavy wagons do tend to have a life of their own - momentum, great on a level layout, PITA on a incline, but give a realism in motion

    Paul
     
  16. Gary

    Gary Wants more time for modelling.... Staff Member Administrator

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    As I'm using Kadee couplers on all of my stock, I tend to add about 18 - 20 grams of lead weight to each wagon. this improves the coupling action, but it does restrict the number of wagons a loco can haul. Adding weight to OO/4mm gauge wagons can be problematic at times as in the case of 'open wagons', where at times you don't really want to add a load to disguise the added weight.

    Cheers, Gary.
     

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