Severn Models brass building kits

Discussion in 'Line Side Buildings' started by Lintor, Jun 5, 2021.

  1. Lintor

    Lintor Full Member

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    Having purchased 3 brass kits from Severn models, specifically the Signal Box, Signal Box interior and the workshop equipment set, I was wondering if any members have tried these kits and can pass on anything that I need to consider before starting them.
    Will post some pictures of various stages of construction, once I get going
    Many thanks
     
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  2. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    I have just finished a 7MM shed using Zap CA super glue . It was my first build using brass and glue . Some parts I used Araldite because positioning needed to be precise. Overall the model was etched well and I was pleased with the result.

    Tony.
     
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  3. Lintor

    Lintor Full Member

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    Thanks Tony. The quality of etch was one of the things that appealed to me.
    My plan is to solder we’re I can, and ‘super glue’ the small intricate pieces.
     
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  4. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    I am in the process of learning how to solder, Andy of Severn Models explained that I only need to use glue , that is why I bought one of his kits .
    At the moment I am trying to solder a Connoisseur GWR Loriot M wagon. I have just ordered a brass cleaning pen and some small files from Squires.

    Tony..
     
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  5. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Hi Tony,

    Nylon pan shiners are really good for cleaning up brass parts for soldering. What size iron are you using and what type of flux?
     
  6. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    I need something quite small to get into the awkward areas. I am using a 30 Watt iron and a temperature controlled iron , the latter being sidelined because I`m not getting on with it. Liquid flux and I have been using paste as well . 145 degree solder . I`m finding that if I tin both sides the parts does not seem to want to adhere.
    I had been trying to solder some scrap brass , the small curved piece attached well , I couldn`t pull it apart with pliers, However , 30 mins later I grabbed hold and it just fell to pieces.

    Tony.
     
  7. Lintor

    Lintor Full Member

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    The main reason for unsuccessful joints is dirt. Are you sure both sides are thoroughly cleaned before soldering. If you're using a burnishing pen, ensure you remove all the residue fibreglass from the cleaned area.
     
  8. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Tony, don't be disillusioned if things don't work straight away. Soldering is skill that you need to work on, practice more on scrap brass, it takes a while to get the hang of it and once you do life gets much more interesting. The pleasure from knowing a model built by yourself from a kit is great and really fulfilling.

    Cheers, Pete.
     
  9. Lintor

    Lintor Full Member

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    I’ll second that Pete.
    Good, sound advice.
    As everything in life… practice makes perfect

    norm
     
  10. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Hi Tony,
    Are you getting a smooth flow with the solder or does it resemble bird droppings?

    I ask because 30 Watts is a bit under powered for 7mm work. I used to have a 40watt iron and struggled with that, I now use an 80 watt.

    Don't confuse physical size with power output.

    You can use a high wattage iron with a fine bit.

    Higher wattage irons both maintain and more importantly replace lost heat quickly. Meaning that the solder continues to flow once you have touched the metal and had heat transfer to the work pieces.
    I suspect that the reason your joint came apart was that the joint didn't get hot enough for long enough for the solder to properly flow.
     
  11. Lintor

    Lintor Full Member

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    Hi Tony.
    You definately need to raise the wattage stakes a bit. I model 4mm and use a 40watt Iron for my brass kits. Heat is definately the key to a good flow.

    Norm
     
  12. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    What I`m getting is, when tinning the solder flows nicely , but the problem arises when I try to join the two pieces , the flux bubbles and hisses but the solder does not want to melt.
    I visited a guy last week who showed me that all his 7MM stock was built using a 40 watt iron. He then helped me to solder my wagon .
    Tony..
     
  13. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    When you go to soldering the two pieces together, what do you have them sat on? If it's something like a metal plate it could be acting as a heat sink, drawing all the heat away from the joint. If not, try holding the bit on the joint longer until the solder go's shiny.
    Take your time mate, you will get there in the end.

    Cheers, Pete.
     
  14. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    The part I was trying to solder on to the wagon chassis is no bigger than my irons tip , I superglued them on in the end.

    Tony.
     
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  15. jakesdad13

    jakesdad13 Staff Member Moderator

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    When I solder smallish parts I've used a tip that Rob Pulham gave me. I cut a tiny piece of solder and place it next to the loose part, the flux will hold it in place while I put the tip of my iron next to it and let the heat travel to it. The part to be soldered on can be held down with a small screwdriver or similar keeping it held down until the solder has set.

    Cheers, Pete.
     
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  16. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Tony, keep at it is my best advice for practice as they say makes perfect. I too use a 40W iron with a chisel tip...I only use 185 solder too, the secret to get solder to flow is to get the iron up to working temperature first and of course with clean etch surfaces (prep with either wire wool or fibre glass pen) hold the both work pieces together in a clamp or some sort of jig and bring the loaded iron to the work pieces... as Pete says Rob Pulham's tip to deposit a slither of solder onto the joint then apply heat is another way of doing the job. Its all a matter of what works best for you in the circumstances... the secret is to clean the etch joints, hold the pieces together and use only the solder you need to make the joint and with a hot iron. Once the solder has taken you will see it "flash" this is where the the hot shiney silver colour cools and suddenly becomes dull, another tip is practice making joints with pieces of scrap etch... you'll soon be making kits. Good luck and do let up know how you go on.:thumbs:
     
  17. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    My Loriot wagon has certainly been a challenge. I have now completed the wagon , It doesn`t look too bad. I`m not looking forward to cleaning it down in readiness for painting as parts may fall off. Two of the buffers are sprung loaded , the other two are fixed because the brake hangers are in the way . I did try and cut out the parts but the frame of the chassis is just too close.

    Tony.
     
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  18. Keith M

    Keith M Staff Member Moderator

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    I use 'normal' multicored electronics solder for my 'brass-to-brass' builds, 100 degree for brass to white metal as I find this gives a strong joint though additional flux is often necessary to ensure a sound joint. Although I have a selection of electric soldering irons, my tool of choice is my Iroda gas torch, using the flame rather than the included soldering iron bit. The fingertip flame adjustment is invaluable for those jobs which need that extra bit of 'turbo boost' when the metal is conducting the heat away as fast as the iron can produce it. Using a gas torch takes a bit of practice initially, but the ability to adjust the heat does tend to make it a 'one size fits all' kind of tool.
    Keith.
     
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  19. Tony Hubbard

    Tony Hubbard Full Member

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    Keith , That is an interesting way of soldering . I think my soldered joints fail due to lack of heat.
    I have added a picture of my wagon .

    Tony.
     

    Attached Files:

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  20. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Despite your struggles Tony, that's a nice result.

    As with all such things you will get better with practice and experience of what works for you.

    My soldering techniques have evolved over the years and I too am a big user of an Iroda solderpro.
    I was also recently given a resistance soldering unit which I find I am using more and more but many people don't get on with them at all. Very much a Marmite tool.
     

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