White metal ingots

Discussion in 'Metals' started by Toto, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Is that what they class as events? There is not any as yet but I was looking at adding a couple in the " trouble areas " to encourage any potential air out of the cast parts areas.

    I need to watch I don't completely mess the mould up though.

    Cheers

    Toto
     
  2. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    Back to basics Toto,
    Can you contact the guy who taught you how to do this and get some advice from him.
    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
  3. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Hi gormo,

    Yes I can and I have been chatting with him. Most of the issues with the larger parts are solvable by getting the spinning correct. Part of the learning curve which is to be expected and it is happening.

    Some of the smaller parts however were always debatable whether they would he suitable for white metal spinning without having to spend to much time spinning to get the number of parts needed to an acceptable standard.

    I have been looking into the possibility of doing some if the more extreme parts with finer detail in lost wax. I am now further refining the list of parts to see which ones may change to lost wax keeping the bigger bulkier and easier to spin parts in white metal. There is a trade of between being able to produce the parts and the time taken to spin enough in sufficient quality / quantity.

    Changing some of the smaller detailed parts to lost wax castings is a route that other traders use and the provision of more parts in lost wax tends to be one that customers like due to the general betterment in terms of quality. Obviously I had to try them in white metal first in order to try and keep the production as much in house as possible. Not at the expense of acceptable quality though. There is a balance to be struck there.

    The learning curve is progressing and some of the potential aborted effort is all part of the overall development process for which I expected to a reasonable degree. I think the trial and error and willingness on my part to know when to take a hit and change path will all go towards the production of better products for which Highlander wants to be associated with rather than an environment of " make do " .

    Exciting times, if a little expensive. :avatar:

    Cheers buddy

    Toto
     
    Rob Pulham likes this.
  4. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Hi Tom,

    I am pretty sure that most builders would prefer brass castings to whitemetal purely because many people have a fear of soldering whitemetal. I have no fear but still prefer brass to whitemetal:D
     
  5. ianvolvo46

    ianvolvo46 Staff Member Moderator

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    I'm with Gormo on this Toto … methinks a 'Torque wrench' would be a useful tool :scratchchin:

    Ian vt
     
  6. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Toto,
    Sounds like you are on top of it mate.....:thumbs:
    Interesting days ahead methinks..... I noted Rob`s post above about people having a fear of soldering white metal. That`s an interesting point. Are your parts meant to be soldered or glued into place. I have no idea about this stuff as I`ve never had a crack at it.
    I was watching the guy on the Repair Shop who deals with clocks, and he had to repair a brass mirror surround and handle. At first he wasn`t sure if the metal was brass, and he was hoping it wasn`t white metal, because he needed to solder the parts together. I must admit he was using a blow torch to solder, however the point was, that white metal would have melted away into a useless blob of metal if he applied a lot of heat to it. Fortunately it was brass and he did a first class job of the restoration.
    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
  7. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    The white metal can be soldered or glued. I believe araldite does the job. If soldering, it's a case of using a low melt solder and an appropriately controlled / rated soldering iron to keep the heat delivered to within the correct temperature parameters.

    Some folks manage it no problem and I think most could if they take the time to educate themselves as to what the correct materials and tools they need are. I don't like the idea either but learn the facts and you shouldn't fry the part. ....... says the expert ....m:facepalm:
     
  8. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    Fair enough Toto,
    You don`t use a hammer to fix a watch.............learn and understand the characteristics of the materials you are working with and use the appropriate tools and accessories.
    All that makes sense to me....thanks for that...:thumbs:
    :cheers::tophat:Gormo
     
  9. Toto

    Toto Staff Member Founder Administrator

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    Did someone say ..... hammer ..... never thought of that.
     
  10. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    :(:eek::oops:
     

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