An NSR Absolute Block instrument

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous & Oddities' started by Andy_Sollis, Aug 5, 2023.

  1. Walkingthedog

    Walkingthedog Full Member

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    I am amazed at what you are able to print. Is it strong enough for a key?
     
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  2. gormo

    gormo Staff Member Administrator

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    G`day Andy,
    Sorry I`ve missed this post....apologies....:faint:
    You need a good covering of Shellac with every coat to start with.
    However before you start, I would go over the bare timber with a fine wool to make it nice and smooth before you apply the shellac.
    The bare timber should be dusted off after smoothing and then give it a wash down with Methylated Spirits to really clean it off.
    The Metho on the timber will also give you an idea of how the finished job will look.
    If I were doing your block instrument I would apply shellac to one side of the box then do the top then do the other side then the front.....then I would come back to the first side and start the process all over again with another coat immediately.
    I would do this maybe five times in the one session. If you find that the shellac pad is starting to drag over the finish, it`s time to stop for the day.
    The first day`s coat of shellac should be allowed to dry for at least a day, maybe two, depending on the atmospheric conditions. Don`t do this in damp weather.
    If there is too much moisture in the air, the shellac will go a milky colour as you put it on. If this happens, stop, let it dry and then rub it back and start again in good dry weather.
    Once you Have your first coat on and it has dried, rub it back with a fine steel wool ( 0000 ) until the surface is smooth to the touch. You may find some areas need more rubbing back than others, but you need to just take the shine off the finish.
    Clean the surface of with a soft cloth.....do not use any Metho this time as it will take the shellac off.
    With a clean surface, apply the next coat in the same way as the first, in other words, multiple coats (maybe 5 ?) or until the pad starts to drag on the surface.
    Let the second coat dry for a day or two and then rub it back to a dull finish. Run you fingers across the surface to feel for little pimples and rub them back if you find any......dust of the surface once again.
    Then apply the third coat in the same way as the previous two coats.....let it dry once again for a couple of days and then give it a light rub back with the fine wool until you take the shine off the surface.
    It is now where you make a judgement call....do you add another coat or not.?
    Three coats should probably be enough, but you must also bare in mind that each subsequent coat adds a further layer of darkness to the tone.
    It`s up to you at this point.
    If you think three is enough then it`s time to finish it off with Beeswax.
    You should be able to get a tin of Beeswax for furniture from your hardware.
    Also get yourself some soft clean cloth.....old Tee shirts are good.
    Use one cloth to apply Beeswax to the box.....do one surface at a time.
    Rub the cloth into the Beeswax....apply it to the surface and rub it in well then immediately remove it with another dry cloth.
    Then buff it with a third clean cloth until you have a smooth satin surface.
    Any Beeswax that gets into hard to get a places can be removed with an old toothbrush.
    Shellac itself should give you a surface that will last for years, especially if you look after it and give it a Beeswaxing maybe once a year, or as you deem necessary. Shellac also loves to be touched by the human hand. It absorbs oils from human skin which helps to preserve it
    The one thing it does not like is having water applied to it or maybe a hot coffee cup stood on it etc.....so it should be treated with respect and it will look good for years.
    Lastly, varnishing over Shellac is possible, but not entirely necessary because the Beeswax adds that protective layer.
    I have a Bridge chair that I did about thirty years ago with shellac. All that it gets is an occasional coat of Beeswax and that`s it.....and the chair gets frequent use and still looks great.
    Hope this helps
    :tophat:Gormo
     
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  3. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Staff Member Moderator

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    If I could post the video, you would see it working.. thankfully the key part is for the levers is ok, but I did snap one key when it jammed.

    idea is now I have a working blank is to go and get a metal one cut.
    As for the latches, not quite sure yet….
     
  4. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Staff Member Moderator

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    Fantastic Brian, thank you so much..

    only thing I have noticed is it does seem to drag a few mins after the first wipe (sponge in a cloth t shirt as suggested) so really only been doing one coat at a time.


    I do need to find some finer wire wool. I only have O at the moment. May be an internet purchase.
    Thanks again. It will all be broken down in to panels and done in some newspaper.
     
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  5. York Paul

    York Paul Staff Member Moderator

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  6. Walkingthedog

    Walkingthedog Full Member

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    Thanks Andy
     
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  7. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Staff Member Moderator

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  8. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Staff Member Moderator

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    Back to doing the trim/beading for the cabinet top glass, trying to set up and use a Router (no, not the thing for the internet, but some whizzy thing with a shaped bit spinning on the bottom)

    Anyway, it didn’t go anywhere near as planned due to the length, and there being osolation in the middle, one shattered and the second came out too thin.
    IMG_8298.jpeg
    this one snapped after it was looking good.

    IMG_8299.jpeg This one as can be seen came out just too thin.

    so the next 30 mins were spent with the thinner (an electric planer) making some new strips from what was left of the last sections and then trimming up on the band saw.

    I’ve opted to go back to the original idea of simply carving them out with the sanding disc on the dremel.
     
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  9. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    Hi Andy,

    Possibly too late now.
    Could you not cut the shape using the router on the full sized stock. Then cut it down to final size using the bandsaw etc?
     
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  10. Andy_Sollis

    Andy_Sollis Staff Member Moderator

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    Erm.... yes. I guess I could.

    We hadn't planned on using a router when we first made them. (and at that time the band saw was playing up, till we realised one of the guides had come loose) so if we need to revisit, yes its probably a better idea. Although I've given the router bits back now. :facepalm:
     
  11. Rob Pulham

    Rob Pulham Happily making models Staff Member Administrator Feature Contributor

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    That's how I would have done it. I did a lot of woodworking before I moved on to metal and one of the things that I refused to let go was my router and router table.
     
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